Ignition

To see a world in a grain of sand,
And a heaven in a wild flower,
Hold infinity in the palm of your hand,
And eternity in an hour.

lunacylover:

A gold ornament featuring a horse head with antlers, Xianbei culture, c. 4th-6th centuries, excavated at Daerhan Maoming’anqi, Inner Mongolia [source].

lunacylover:

A gold ornament featuring a horse head with antlers, Xianbei culture, c. 4th-6th centuries, excavated at Daerhan Maoming’anqi, Inner Mongolia [source].

(via huhwaitwhowhat)

ufansius:

Bloodstone tazza (cup) with enameled gold mounts - Charles Duron, circa 1870.

(via huhwaitwhowhat)

amnhnyc:

Travel back in time and explore the Museum archives on October 5th!

Celebrate New York Archives Week by coming to the Museum Library to discover the Museum’s rich history of scientific exploration from around the world. Rarely seen collections of field notes, films, photography, artwork, and memorabilia will be on display to tell the hidden stories behind the Museum’s world-famous dioramas and exhibitions.

Watch early moving-image footage from historic Central Asiatic Expeditions to Mongolia, in which a team led by Roy Chapman Andrews discovers the first dinosaur eggs, or browse the original landscape studies painted in the field during Carl Akeley’s perilous expeditions to Africa. The Library staff will explain how these one-of-a-kind objects are cared for and give hands-on demonstrations of the new Digital Special Collections, an online endeavor to make the Library’s extensive image collection available for research and reference. 

This event is part of the New York Archives Week, which runs October 5-11, 2014, an annual celebration aimed at informing the general public about the diverse array of archival materials available in the metropolitan New York region.

The tours, which run between 12 pm - 5 pm are free with Museum admission.

Register today!

beautiesofafrique:

African ethnic group of the week: the Imazighen (Amazigh ) people of Niger, Tunisia, Libya,  Mauritania, Mali, Algeria and Morocco)

The Maghreb or western North Africa on the whole is believed to have been inhabited by Imazighen since from at least 10,000 B.C. Northern African cave paintings, dating back twelve millennia, have been found in the Tassili n’Ajjer region, southern Algeria. Others were found in Tadrart Acacus in the Libyan desert. A Neolithic society, marked by bestial domestication and subsistence agriculture, developed in the Saharan and Mediterranean region (the Maghreb) of northern Africa between 6000 B.C and 2000 B.C. This type of life, richly depicted in the Tassili n’Ajjer cave paintings of south-eastern Algeria, predominated in the Maghreb until the classical period. Prehistorical Tifinagh scripts were also found in the Oran region. During the pre-Roman era, several successive independent states (Massylii) existed before the king Masinissa unified the people of Numidia.

They speak various Amazigh languages belonging to the Afro-Asiatic family related to Ancient Egyptian. At the turn of the 21st century, there were perhaps 14 million in Morocco, 9 million in Algeria, and much smaller numbers in Tunisia, Libya, Egypt, and Mauretania; in the Sahara of southern Algeria and of Libya, Mali and Niger, the  Imazighen Tuareg number about 1 million.

The Imazighen originally lived all over the Maghreb from western Egypt to the Atlantic. The culturally distinct Imazighen communities of today survive in pockets in the mountains and in the Sahara desert, scattered over a large area from the Siwa Oasis in Egypt to the Atlantic and from the Niger river and the Sahel in the south to the Mediterranean. Their density increases from east to west, Morocco being the state with most Berbers living in it.

Before the eleventh century, most of North-West Africa was a Imazighen -speaking Muslim area. The process of Arabization only became a major factor with the arrival of the Banu Hilal, a tribe sent by the Fatimids of Egypt to punish the Imazighen  Zirid dynasty for having abandoned Shiism. The Banu Hilal reduced the Zirids to a few coastal towns and took over much of the plains; their influx was a major factor in the Arabization of the region and in the spread of nomadism in areas where agriculture had previously been dominant. After the Muslim conquest, the Imazighen  ethnic groups of coastal North Africa became almost fully Islamized. 

image

image

Dihya or Kahina was a Amazigh queen, religious and military leader who led indigenous resistance to Arab Islamic expansion in Northwest Africa, the region then known as Numidia. She was born in the early 7th century and died around the end of the 7th century in modern-day Algeria.

Regarding the remaining populations that speak a Berber language in the Maghreb, they account for about half of the Moroccan population and a third of the Algerian, besides smaller communities in Libya and Tunisia and very small groups in Egypt and Mauritania.

Outside the Maghreb, the Tuareg in Mali, Niger and Burkina Faso number some 600,000; 400,000 and 120,000 respectively, although Tuaregs are often seen as a distinct group. They are thought to be the founder population of the  Imazighen due to their high frequency of E-M81(E1b1b1b), the  Imazighen genetic marker.

Prominent  Imazighen groups include the Kabyles of northern Algeria, who number about six million and have kept, to a large degree, their original language and society; and the Shilha or Chleuh (French, from Arabic Shalh and Shilha ašəlḥi) in High and Anti-Atlas regions of Morocco, numbering about eight million. Other groups include the Riffians of northern Morocco, the Chaoui people of eastern Algeria, the Chenouas in western Algeria, the  Imazighen of Tripolitania and the Tuaregs of the Sahara scattered through several countries.

Though stereotyped in Europe and North America as nomads, most  Imazighen were in fact traditionally farmers, living in mountains relatively close to the Mediterranean coast, or oasis dwellers, such as the Siwa of Egypt; but the Tuareg and Zenaga of the southern Sahara were almost wholly nomadic. Some groups, such as the Chaouis, practiced transhumance.

Sources: 1| 2| 3

(via redguardparty)

eyeburfi2:

Siyah mashq (lit. ‘black practice’ in Persian) originally referred to calligraphic practice sheets where words and letters were written facing in several directions and over each other, in order to conserve paper. However, when calligraphers realized how stunning some of these pieces were, siyah mashq evolved into a style of its own, where words and letters were repeated, regardless of meaning, in rhythmical compositions.
via islambook.net

eyeburfi2:

Siyah mashq (lit. ‘black practice’ in Persian) originally referred to calligraphic practice sheets where words and letters were written facing in several directions and over each other, in order to conserve paper. However, when calligraphers realized how stunning some of these pieces were, siyah mashq evolved into a style of its own, where words and letters were repeated, regardless of meaning, in rhythmical compositions.

via islambook.net

(via peth)

poboh:

Floral symphony, Gerrit Haverkamp. Dutch (1872 - 1926)

poboh:

Floral symphony, Gerrit Haverkamp. Dutch (1872 - 1926)

(via huhwaitwhowhat)

cg54kck:

cg54kck:
Euan Uglow
Zagi 1981-2

cg54kck:

cg54kck:

Euan Uglow

Zagi 1981-2

(via huhwaitwhowhat)

know4life:

Ancient Egyptian Woman with 70 Hair Extensions Discovered

She was not mummified, her body simply being wrapped in a mat. When archaeologists uncovered her remains they found she wore “a very complex coiffure with approximately 70 extensions fastened in different layers and heights on the head,” writes Jolanda Bos, an archaeologist working on the Amarna Project, in an article recently published in the Journal of Egyptian Archaeology.

know4life:

Ancient Egyptian Woman with 70 Hair Extensions Discovered

She was not mummified, her body simply being wrapped in a mat. When archaeologists uncovered her remains they found she wore “a very complex coiffure with approximately 70 extensions fastened in different layers and heights on the head,” writes Jolanda Bos, an archaeologist working on the Amarna Project, in an article recently published in the Journal of Egyptian Archaeology.

(via grillfriend)

ancientart:

Bracelets from ancient Iran.

The first one is from the Achaemenid period (550-330 BCE), and made of silver. The remaining bronze bracelets are from western Iran, and date to 1000-650 BCE.

Courtesy of the LACMA, via their online collectionsM.88.79M.76.97.288, & M.76.97.285.


The head of a funerary couch in the form of a cheetah with tears falling from his eyes.
Book: Tutankhamen’s Treasures

Ancient Roman gold bracelet in the form of a coiled snake
1st century AD, Pompeii (The British Museum)
passion4plants:

dahlia ‘arabian night’it’s hard to capture the right colorthe surface is very velvety so it’ll look different from each angleit’s a very intense and dark redone of my favorite dahlias

passion4plants:

dahlia ‘arabian night’

it’s hard to capture the right color
the surface is very velvety so it’ll look different from each angle
it’s a very intense and dark red

one of my favorite dahlias

(via stonerswithboners)

vergen:

The Three Ages of Woman by Gustav Klimt (1905)

vergen:

The Three Ages of Woman by Gustav Klimt (1905)

(via vergen)